An established San Francisco interior design firm renowned for their sophisticated yet comfortable aesthetic, ScavulloDesign is unique in their approach to designing healthy homes. Whether designing a Stinson beach house or Atherton estate, ScavulloDesign considers how the fabric, furnishings, and finishes in your home impact your wellbeing. We sat down with ScavulloDesign's Janine Aurichio and Marysia Rybock to learn more about this one-of-a-kind design service. 

Tell us a little about your Healthy Homes services. Are all of the projects you design healthy, or only when the client requests them to be?

To us, it means designing stylish, creative living environments that also consider health and wellness as part of the design and construction decisions. For example, your choice of fabrics, flooring, lighting and other elements inside your home can add to your health and well-being while also protecting you and your family from the unhealthy effects of some materials.  We are passionate about creating homes that contribute to our clients’ overall health and well-being. Healthy is not necessarily “green,” though it can be. It’s about the materials not emitting chemicals, gasses and particles that could be irritating or damaging to our client’s and their families. We meticulously specify all the materials that go into the interior finishes, fixtures and furnishings to minimize or eliminate VOCs, EMFs, formaldehyde and other noxious substances. These decisions, while seemingly small individually, together help create a healthy environment without sacrificing creativity and style.

How did you become interested in healthy design? 

It started with one client who suffered terribly with chemical sensitivities of all kinds. Since then, we’ve been surprised by the number of clients who have the same sensitivities or who are just interested in living in an environment that promotes their overall wellness.

What are some of the benefits of healthy design? 

Better sleep from balanced circadian rhythms, improved respiration, decreased allergies, more energy, improved healthy and productivity.

Tell us about some of your favorite Healthy Homes projects. What are some examples of innovative solutions you've used?  

We have one client with multiple homes in the Bay Area and we have created or are creating healthy environments in all of them. We work closely with the client and a testing service to test every single material that is used in every element of the home and its furnishings. It is so satisfying to hear how much better they feel and to know that their children are growing up in a safe, healthy environment. One of our fabulous vendors created a beautiful wood finish using coffee grounds, red wine and chocolate!

Outside of Healthy Homes, how else does ScavulloDesign demonstrate their commitment to your clients’ well-being? 

We are very serious about delivering the best possible service, experience and outcome for all of our clients. Because we get to know our clients so well, we can tailor every minute detail to their needs, desires and quality of life. When we develop designs we consider every aspect of their interaction with that design – how they will move through and use a space, how the design will adapt as they and their children grow older, how materials selected will stand the test of time.

Who are some of your favorite vendors and products for eco-conscious furniture, home decor, and lifestyle goods?

We are so lucky to have some of the best and most creative artisans and craftspeople as partners. Almost all of the healthy pieces we create are custom because the movement has not gone main stream yet (but it will!). We work with upholsterers in San Francisco who manufacture to our specified list of materials and furniture makers in San Francisco and Napa who do as well. Our general contractor partners will also adhere to our materials list to ensure the entire structure is compliant. We use OMI mattresses a lot and Benjamin Moore Natura paint.

For more infomation on ScavulloDesign, please visit their GRAIL profile here. Interior photography credit: Paul Dyer.